August 22, 2015

Sudan and South Sudan autosomal genetics

Quantity over quality series.


Begoña Dobon et al., The genetics of East African populations: a Nilo-Saharan component in the African genetic landscape. Nature - Scientific Reports 2015. Open access → LINK [doi:10.1038/srep09996]


Abstract

East Africa is a strategic region to study human genetic diversity due to the presence of ethnically, linguistically, and geographically diverse populations. Here, we provide new insight into the genetic history of populations living in the Sudanese region of East Africa by analysing nine ethnic groups belonging to three African linguistic families: Niger-Kordofanian, Nilo-Saharan and Afro-Asiatic. A total of 500 individuals were genotyped for 200,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Principal component analysis, clustering analysis using ADMIXTURE, FST statistics, and the three-population test were used to investigate the underlying genetic structure and ancestry of the different ethno-linguistic groups. Our analyses revealed a genetic component for Sudanese Nilo-Saharan speaking groups (Darfurians and part of Nuba populations) related to Nilotes of South Sudan, but not to other Sudanese populations or other sub-Saharan populations. Populations inhabiting the North of the region showed close genetic affinities with North Africa, with a component that could be remnant of North Africans before the migrations of Arabs from Arabia. In addition, we found very low genetic distances between populations in genes important for anti-malarial and anti-bacterial host defence, suggesting similar selective pressures on these genes and stressing the importance of considering functional pathways to understand the evolutionary history of populations.


Figure 3: ADMIXTURE results for the 14 populations.

2 comments:

  1. "Populations inhabiting the North of the region showed close genetic affinities with North Africa, with a component that could be remnant of North Africans before the migrations of Arabs from Arabia."

    It is not obvious that the migration of Arabs from Arabia had any meaningful demic impact on Sudan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, they speak Arab nowadays mostly. That's an impact.

      I think they are using that rather as chronological reference than as "claim" of anything.

      Delete

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