September 27, 2012

Neolithic 'calendar' found in Vietnam

The artifact, marked with ordered dots and strips that may well represent the lunar cycle, was found in Nguom Hau Cave (Na Hang District, Tuyên Quang province, Northern Vietnam). 

A similar artifact was discovered in 1985 not far away: Na Cooc Cave (Thái Nguyên province). 

The calendar has been estimated to be from c. 4000 years ago. 

The stone tool was found in a tomb marked with 14 large stones laid at a length of 1.6m. Bones were found under the stones but no skull was found, with Chung guessing that the skull may have decayed due to the humidity in the cave.

A number of other stone tools were buried with the corpse.

The dig also produced much other information from the Iron Age (3.0-3.5 Ka BP), Late Neolithic (4.0-4.3 Ka BP) and a deeper and very thick Early Neolithic layer consisting of many polished stone axes and other tools.

Together with other findings, the evidence mounts for inhabitation from at least 8000 years ago in this area. 

Source: Viêt Nam News (via Pileta).

2 comments:

  1. "Together with other findings, the evidence mounts for inhabitation from at least 8000 years ago in this area".

    The area would be close to where the Hoabinhian was first described, so inhabitation may be even older, at least close by. I realise you're already very aware of the Hoabinhian but here's a reminder:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoabinhian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've thought the same but they seem to mean the specific district or an otherwise very narrow geographical zone. I did not dare to question the news article with such specificity.

      Delete

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